E20: The Nordic pandemic. With Stellan Vinthagen (45 min)

December 11, 2020 00:39:12
E20:
Socialism in the Time of Corona
E20: The Nordic pandemic. With Stellan Vinthagen (45 min)
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Show Notes

Sweden guarantees health care as a constitutional right, and its citizens have generally followed their national health experts’ guidelines during the pandemic. And yet the infection and death rates per capita in Sweden are shockingly similar to those in the U.S. Stellan Vinthagen, Endowed Chair in the Study of Nonviolent Direct Action and Civil Resistance, Professor of Sociology at The University of Massachusetts, Amherst, explains why. His latest book is Conceptualizing Everyday Resistance (Routledge, 2020). Vinthagen has been active in several environmental, peace and migrants’ rights movements since 1980, and was one of the initiators of the Swedish Ship to Gaza 2008, a coalition member of the Freedom Flotilla.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/coronavirus-maps.html#countries

Episode Transcript

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